October LGBTQ+ Meet Up: WITCH BOY by Molly Ostertag! **10.20.18**

LBGTQ+ MEET-UP: Comics & More!

*Allies & Mature Teens Welcome*

 

Join us in sharing and learning about comics & pop-culture,
with a focus on
gay and transgender communities.

Please review the Notes for a Good LBGTQ+ and Allies Meet-Up at the bottom of this post.

 

**Special Week!  Saturday October 20th  4p-6p**

 

WITCH BOY by Molly Ostertag

Scholastic

~ From the illustrator of the web comic Strong Female Protagonist comes a debut middle-grade graphic novel about family, identity, courage, and magic. ~
Even magic has rules . . .
Everyone in Aster’s family is born with magic. Boys grow up to be shapeshifters; girls into witches. No exceptions.
But Aster can’t seem to get the hang of shapeshifting. Instead, he spends his time spying on the witchery lessons the girls are getting. He seems to have a knack for casting spells and wants to know more, but the only person he can share his growing gift with is Charlie, a girl from the non-magical side of town.
Then, during a night of shapeshifting practice, one of the boys goes missing. Aster knows he can search for the boy with the witchcraft he’s been secretly learning. Could breaking his family’s most important tradition save the day—or ruin everything?

Drawn to Comics: Molly Ostertag’s “The Witch Boy” Is Full of Magic Without Gender Roles

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Check out our FaceBook event and group page!

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Notes for a Good LBGTQ+ and Allies Meet-Up

  • Confidentiality! Our discussions will get into sensitive topics and personal stories will be shared, so the Vegas Rule is in effect: No sharing of personal details outside of this group. It’s OK to use general and vague references, but not specific names, etc.
  • Find the Positive It may take some work, but purposefully finding a positive or constructive way to approach a difficulty is essential to growth. We’ll help each other.
  • Ouch/Oops If something hurtful is said, saying “Ouch,” can let that be known. “Oops”
    acknowledges the error and opens the way for considerate correction.
  • You Speak for Yourself We all belong to many groups but we are not their sole representatives. One may share their own experiences but they do not speak for an entire community.
  • Don’t Yuck Their Yum Everybody’s different, so we don’t pass judgement. We’re all adults, ok?
  • Ask for Direction, Not an Explanation It’s not the job of the oppressed to educate the oppressor. Before you ask a question that can be answered by a websearch, consider if you’re asking the best question.
  • Yield the Floor Folks who speak more freely must actively let others have a turn.